Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues” are back by popular demand at Langosta Lounge to benefit 180 and Garden State Equality

Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues” are back by popular demand at Langosta Lounge! This event features local performers with talent that is sure to please. A portion of the proceeds benefit 180 Turning Lives Around, Inc. and Garden State Equality.

February 24th 4:30pm – 6:00 pm

Langosta Lounge – 1000 Ocean Avenue, Asbury Park, NJ 07712

Ticket Options:

Show Only $20
or
Show & 3 Course Pre-Fixe Dinner After Show $45*
*Gratuities not included
Any questions, please contact Langosta Lounge:
(732) 455-3275

Become A Volunteer Advocate for Victims of Domestic Violence

 

Become A Volunteer Advocate for Victims of Domestic Violence:

Applications Are Available for Next Training Course

 

You can be the change you want to see in the world by joining 180’s life-saving and life-changing mission today. 180 Turning Lives Around (180), a private non-profit organization in Monmouth County, continues to provide confidential support and advocacy to victims of domestic violence in the aftermath of a highly emotional and traumatic experience with the assistance of its dedicated response team volunteers. 180 will be conducting a 40-hour mandatory training course for new Domestic Violence Response Team (DVRT) Victim Advocates, April 29th-May 23rd, Mondays/Wednesdays/Thursdays, 6:00pm-9:30pm, in the courtroom at Hazlet Police Headquarters, 255 Middle Road in Hazlet. Training will be provided to successful applicants.

 

180’s volunteer DVRT Advocates are civilian members of the community who work collaboratively with law enforcement to provide support, information, and resources to victims of domestic violence at police headquarters. Advocates also discuss with victims safety planning and their legal rights in regard to obtaining a Temporary Restraining Order. By providing empathy and a crucial perspective of the situation, these specially-trained advocates help to empower victims to make informed decisions for themselves and their families.

 

Basic requirements for volunteers to apply include that they must be eighteen years of age or older, have access to reliable transportation, possess a valid driver’s license, be willing to serve on an on-call shift basis, participate in an interview process, submit to background investigations and fingerprinting, and successfully complete the mandatory training. The police departments and 180 are committed to culturally and socially diverse teams to better serve the community. Bi-lingual capability is helpful. Prior knowledge of domestic violence is not required. The identities of the DVRT volunteers are kept anonymous. For an application or additional information, please contact Tina Morgan, Assistant Coordinator, Victim Support Program, at tinam@180nj.org or 732 264-4360, Ext. 4272. Please mention the town where you reside. Deadline to apply is April 19th. Applications are also available for download at https://180nj.org/give-help/volunteering/domestic-violence-response-team-advocate/

 

The free, confidential service of the DVRT program is available for victims of domestic violence, 24-hours a day, 7-days a week, at police departments in Monmouth County.

 

For forty-three years, 180 Turning Lives Around has been dedicated to providing emergency safe housing, counseling, support, prevention, education, and advocacy in Monmouth County for individuals and families affected by domestic violence, sexual violence, and human trafficking. If you, or someone you know, is in need of assistance, please call the 180 Turning Lives Around 24/7 Confidential Hotline at 732-264-4111 or 888-843-9262. Visit www.180nj.org for more information. In an emergency, dial 9-1-1.

Teen Dating: Understanding Signs of a Healthy and Unhealthy Relationship

Please make time for a conversation with your teen about healthy vs. unhealthy relationships by reviewing the “Signs of Unhealthy and Healthy Relationship” below. Understanding behaviors can help your teen understand if they are in a potentially dangerous relationship.

UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS
Understanding these behaviors can help you figure out if you’re in an unhealthy or dangerous relationship. Many times, these behaviors are used to gain power or control and can have a negative impact on your well-being or day to day life. In some cases, these unhealthy behaviors can escalate to violence. If you feel like something might be off in your relationship, trust your gut and get help.

 

INTENSITY

Having really extreme feelings or over-the-top behavior that feels like too much. Examples are rushing the pace of a relationship, always wanting to see you and talk to you, and feeling like someone is obsessed with you.

JEALOUSY

An emotion that everyone experiences, jealousy becomes unhealthy when someone lashes out or tries to control you because of it. Examples can be getting upset when you text or hang out with people your partner feels threatened by, accusing you of flirting or cheating, being possessive over you or even going so far as to stalk you.

MANIPULATION

When a partner tries to influence your decisions, actions or emotions. Manipulation is not always easy to spot, but some examples are convincing you to do things you wouldn’t normally feel comfortable with, ignoring you until they get their way, and using gifts and apologies to influence your decisions or get back in your good graces.

ISOLATION

Keeping you away from friends, family, or other people. Examples can be when your partner makes you choose between them and your friends, insisting you spend all your time with them, making you question your own judgement of friends and family, and making you feel dependent on them for money, love or acceptance.

SABOTAGE

Purposely ruining your reputation, achievements or success. Examples can be making you miss work, school or practice, keeping you from getting school work done, talking about you behind your back or starting rumors, and threatening to share private information about you.

BELITTLING

Making you feel bad about yourself. Examples can be calling you names, making rude remarks about who you hang out with, your family or what you look like, and making fun of you – even if it’s played off as just a joke.

GUILTING

Making you feel guilty or responsible for your partner’s actions. Examples can be making you feel responsible for their happiness, making you feel like everything is your fault, threatening to hurt themselves or others if you don’t do as they say or stay with them, pressuring you to do anything sexual you’re not comfortable with.

VOLATILITY

Unpredictable overreactions that make you feel like you need to walk on eggshells around them or do things to keep them from lashing out. Examples can be mood swings, losing control of themselves by getting violent or yelling, threatening to hurt you or destroy things, and making you feel afraid of them. This can also be lots of drama or ups and downs in a relationship.

DEFLECTING RESPONSIBILITY

Making excuses for their behavior. Examples can be blaming you, other people or past experiences for their actions, using alcohol or drugs as an excuse, using mental health issues or past experiences (like a cheating ex or divorced parents) as a reason for unhealthy behavior.

BETRAYAL

When your partner acts differently with you versus how they act when you’re not around. Examples can be lying to you, purposely leaving you out or not telling you things, being two-faced, acting differently around friends, or cheating while in a relationship with you.

 

 

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Healthy relationships are ones that bring out the best in you. Even though no relationship is perfect, healthy relationships make you feel good almost all of the time and generally bring you up and not down. Here are some characteristics and behaviors of a healthy relationship. Keep in mind that with all of these behaviors, there’s a threshold for when it becomes unhealthy. For instance, loyalty is great, but at a certain point it can be unhealthy if you are being loyal to a partner who continuously disrespects you. At the end of the day, the below characteristics in a healthy relationship make you feel confident and supported.

COMFORTABLE PACE

You and your partner allow the relationship to happen at a pace that feels comfortable for both of you. Often times when you begin dating someone, you may feel that you’re spending all of your time with them because you want to – that is great! But be sure that nothing feels imbalanced or rushed in the relationship. In a healthy relationship, nobody pressures the other to have sex, make the relationship exclusive, move in together, meet their family and friends, get married, or have a baby.  When you do choose to take these steps, you both feel happy and excited about it—no mixed feelings.

HONESTY

Being truthful and open with your partner. It’s important to be able to talk together about what you both want. In a healthy relationship, you can talk to your partner without fearing how they’ll respond or if you’ll be judged. They may not like what you have to say, but a healthy partner will respond to disappointing news in a considerate way.  Some examples are having good communication about what you both want and expect and never feeling like you have to hide who you talk to or hang with from your partner.

INDEPENDENCE

Having space and freedom in your relationship to do you. Examples are when your partner supports you having friends and a life outside of your relationship and not needing to be attached at the hip or know every little detail about your life.

RESPECT

If respect is present in your relationship, your partner will value your beliefs, opinions and who you are as a person. Examples are complimenting you, supporting your hard work and dreams, not trying to push or overstep your boundaries, and sticking up for you.

EQUALITY

You and your partner have the same say and put equal effort into the relationship (instead of feeling like one person has more say than the other). Examples are feeling like you are heard in your relationship or feeling comfortable speaking up, making decisions together as opposed to one person calling all the shots, and equally compromising on decisions in your relationship that make the other person feel important or respected.

COMPASSION

Feeling a sense of care and concern from your partner and knowing that they will be there to support you, too. If you’re in a healthy relationship, your partner will be kind to you, they will understand and be supportive of you when you’re going through tough times, and they will lend a helping hand in times of need.  An important caveat is that it has to be two-sided and displayed equally.

TAKING RESPONSIBILITY

You and your partner are both responsible for your own actions and words. You both avoid putting blame on each other and own up to your actions when you do something wrong. Examples are when your partner genuinely apologizes for their mistakes, they avoid taking things out on you when they’re upset, and they try to make positive changes to better your relationship.

LOYALTY

When your partner is reliable and you feel confident that they have your back. Some examples are when your partner is respectful and faithful, sticks up for you, doesn’t take sides against you but helps you see the middle ground, and keeps your secrets safe.  In a healthy relationship, you don’t have to test the other person’s loyalty, because you just know it’s there.  Sometimes people say “we all make mistakes” and “nobody’s perfect” to make excuses for disloyalty.  If you find yourself saying that more than once, it’s a red flag that the relationship may not be healthy.

COMMUNICATION

If you can talk to your partner about anything—the good and the bad—this is a sign of a healthy relationship. Examples are when you feel like your partner will listen to you when you need to talk and that they are open to discussing further and when you don’t feel judged for your words or opinions.

180’s hotline is available for any teen who would like to speak with a counselor. The hotline is confidential and anonymous. 1-888-843-9262

 

Credit: Relationships 101: Know the Basics, One Love Foundation, Bronxville NY

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Creative Arts Therapist

The Amanda’s Easel Program of 180 TURNING LIVES AROUND Inc in Monmouth County is seeking a Creative Arts Therapist (art, play, drama, or movement) to be part of our therapeutic interdisciplinary team.  Responsibilities include implementation of individual, group and family sessions, intakes, assessments and comprehensive treatment plans with children ages 4-14 who are affected by family violence and trauma.
Master’s degree in a Creative Arts Therapy discipline is required and must be board certified/licensed or certification/license eligible.
One to three years’ experience working with children and families who have experienced domestic violence or other forms of trauma is strongly preferred.  Bilingual is desired. Position is 25 hrs/wk. Candidate must be available to work two to three afternoon/ evening  per week, with scheduling flexibility.
Benefits including medical/dental and vacation/sick time.
Please contact Program Coordinator Cynthia Westendorf LPC ATR-BC at cindiw@180nj.org